Wellbeing has been much talked about lately, and talk is an important part of wellbeing. It’s more important than ever to overcome the barriers children experience to talk, so it’s a good time to emphasise engagement and participation. 

Here are three levels of Argumentators that you can use to create an enormous number of questions. Before announcing the question, ask the class for suggestions for the [VARIABLES] you need to complete the question. Not only does that lead to amusing or interesting questions, it allows the group to be involved from the start. It also takes no time at all to plan or set up, which is good for teacher wellbeing!

Light and Silly – Small Talk Before Big Talk

Which would be a better [OCCUPATION], a [ANIMAL] or a [ANIMAL]? (e.g. “Which would be a better shopkeeper, a gorilla or a tiger?”
Would a [ANIMAL] be better travelling by [MODE OF TRANSPORT] or by [MODE OF TRANSPORT]?
Should a [MYTHOLOGICAL CREATURE] live in [PLACE TO LIVE] or [PLACE TO LIVE]?
Should a [MYTHOLOGICAL CREATURE] work as a [OCCUPATION] or as a [OCCUPATION]?
Would a [OCCUPATION] or a [OCCUPATION] have a better chance of surviving in [DANGEROUS PLACE OR SITUATION]?
Would a [ANIMAL] or a [ANIMAL] be better at [SPORT OR HOBBY]?
What is the opposite of a [ANIMAL]? 

More Serious. Quirky

Can you control [EMOTION]?
Is [ABSTRACT NOUN] real?
Can [PROBLEM IN SOCIETY] be solved?
Can you buy [EMOTION]? 

A much richer resource on these lines is the Question X from David’ Birch’s Thinking Beans (available in all good book shops owned by me), a cleverly curated pic’n’mix of nouns, verbs and adjectives your class can use to fill out a variety of question frames, creating 2,240 combinations in all.  

Best wishes, 

Jason

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